Bobby Premarajan Amarasingam is a former baptist minister and says that if his designs come to fruition the vast majority of any profits will go to support third world projects, and he has set up a series of trusts to ensure this happens.

In the finest tradition of backyard inventors across the world a self-taught Somerset engineer believes he has come up with a design that will revolutionise sea transport.

Bobby Premarajan Amarasingam of Wells has turned the accepted principles of boat propulsion on their head, to create the Bow Rove Mk 1.
The design does away with propellers churning up water, and petrol or diesel propulsion.

Instead his design uses a set of three metal cones that sit inside each other. By moving them rapidly back and forwards, the cones create a jet of water that smoothly push the boat along.

Bobby Premarajan Amarasingam is a former baptist minister and says that if his designs come to fruition the vast majority of any profits will go to support third world projects, and he has set up a series of trusts to ensure this happens.

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In the finest tradition of backyard inventors across the world a self-taught Somerset engineer believes he has come up with a design that will revolutionise sea transport.

Bobby Premarajan Amarasingam of Wells has turned the accepted principles of boat propulsion on their head, to create the Bow Rove Mk 1.
The design does away with propellers churning up water, and petrol or diesel propulsion.

Instead his design uses a set of three metal cones that sit inside each other. By moving them rapidly back and forwards, the cones create a jet of water that smoothly push the boat along.

The current prototype is powered by a 160w electric motor from a mobility scooter, but Bobby believes that a future design will be able to do away with the motor all together.

“Instead it could be powered by electric solenoids that would push the cones backwards and forwards. Whichever way the cones are moving, forward propulsion is always underway.”

The cones at the heart of the propulsion systemBobby says he has already patented the design, which has now been licenced for production by companies in Australia and India who want to use it for both boat propulsion and to build a new kind of water pump.

One of the features of the machine, a series of vents means it cannot jam or tangle if foreign bodies end up in the mechenism – they are simply spat out at the other end

While a rotating propeller produces a lot of wasted energy, Bobby’s design, he claims, is vastly more efficient and unlike propellers, which can only be positioned at the stern, the Bow Rove mk 1 can be mounted at any point on the boat’s hull.

Bobby is an inveterate designer of unusual machines. In 2010 he made the Alpha Omega Gravity Freefall Generator, which used centrifugal force to – he claims – produce more energy than it consumes.

One of the centrifugal force generatorsThe design is so unusual that patent office would not accept it, saying that the laws of physics said it could not work as he claimed, so it could not be patented.

In the ensuing years he has been refining his centrifugal force machines, to make them more robust, compact and efficient.

A range of designs which use counter balances have been reengineered so that instead of the heavy weights that used to be part of the designs, jets of water are used to power flywheels that use their own power to suck the water that propels them through an Archimedes Screw system.

 

Bobby is a former baptist minister and says that if his designs come to fruition the vast majority of any profits will go to support third world projects, and he has set up a series of trusts to ensure this happens.

However he believes that big business, which relies on fossil fuels to make its money will do whatever it takes to protect their interests – even suggesting that his life could be at risk for going public.

[Source:-Somersetlive]